Corrections and Additions


Revision date: 10 June 2004

Regarding Governor Douglas and land pre-emptions in 1869

The date should be 1860 not 1869.

In Chapter 3, on page 72, the original text read:

As early as January 4, 1869, Governor Douglas had issued a proclamation which permitted any British subject the right to enter on and pre-empt land, not exceeding 160 acres, by planting a post at one corner and giving a description of the land to the Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works.

This error is no doubt a typo.

Governor James Douglas retired in 1863.  And, in 1860, the Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works was Richard Clement Moody, Captain, Royal Engineers. 

Thank you, Simon Sherwood.

Click here to return to Chapter 3, page 72, or if you wish to read the following there will another link to return you to where you came from.

Between 2 December 1858 and 1 June 1870, thirteen proclamations pertaining to pre-emption and land rights were issued.  The following is, in part, the 3rd, issued by then Governor James Douglas, on 4 January 1860:

January 4, 1860:

WHEREAS, by virtue of an Act of Parliament made and passed in the 21st and 22nd years of the Reign of Her Most Gracious Majesty the Queen, and by a Commission under the Great Seal of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, in conformity therewith I, JAMES DOUGLAS, Governor of the Colony of British Columbia, have been authorized by Proclamation issued under the Public Seal of the said Colony, to make laws, institutions, and ordinances, for the peace and good government of the same, and

WHEREAS, it is expedient, pending the operation of the survey of agricultural lands in British Columbia, to provide means whereby unsurveyed agricultural lands may be lawfully acquired by pre- emption in British Columbia by British subjects, and in certain cases to provide for the sale of unsurveyed agricultural land in British Columbia by private contract;

Now, therefore, I, James Douglas, Governor of British Columbia, by virtue of the authority aforesaid, do proclaim, order and enact.

1. That from and after the date hereof, British subjects and aliens who shall take the oath of allegiance to Her Majesty and Her successors, may acquire unoccupied and unreserved, and unsurveyed Crown land in British Columbia (not being the site of an existent or proposed town, or auriferous land available for mining purposes, or an Indian Reserve or settlement) in fee simple, under the following conditions:

. . . . .

3. Whenever the Government survey shall extend to the land claimed, the claimant who has recorded his claim as aforesaid, or his heirs or in case of the grant of certificate of improvement hereinafter men- tioned, the assigns of such claimant shall, if he or they shall have been in continuous occupation of the same land from the date of the record aforesaid, be entitled to purchase the land so pre-empted at such rate as may for the time being be fixed by the Government of British Columbia, not exceeding the sum of 10s. per acre.

. . . . .

13. Whenever a person in occupation at the time of record aforesaid, shall have recorded as aforesaid, and he, his heirs or assigns, shall have continued in permanent occupation of land pre-empted, or of land purchased as aforesaid, he or they may, save as hereinafter mentioned, bring ejectment or trespass against any intruder upon the land so pre-empted or purchased, to the same extent as if he or they were seized of the legal estate in possession in the land so pre- empted or purchased.

14. Nothing herein contained shall be construed as giving a right to any claimant to exclude free miners from searching for any of the precious minerals, or working the same upon the conditions aforesaid.

The above quotation was found at http://library.usask.ca/native/cnlc/vol07/017.html

Click here to return to Chapter 3, page 72

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Revision date: 10 June 2004

Regarding John James Taylor

Said Tannis Pond on the Children of Fort Langley site:

In 1872 it was Fort Langley hotel keeper James Taylor who prompted 29 land owners in the Langley and Derby district to petition the authorities in Victoria and request incorporation into a municipality.

James married Catherine Fallardeau, the daughter of Narcisse Fallardeau and Helen/Ellen, on the 26th of July in 1858. This union produced seven children before Catherine died in 1874. According to the gravestone in the Taylor Plot in the Fort Langley Municipal Cemetery she was 33 years old.

After the death of Catherine, James married Barbara Jamieson. This union produced no children.

In Chapter 3, on page 68, in Birth of Langley Municipality, the original text read:

He was first married to Barbara Jamieson ofAberdeenshire, Scotland, who bore him one son.  When she died in 1874 at the age of 33 he married Catherine Fallardeau, the daughter of Narcisse Fallardeau and sister of Mrs. West, who bore him another six.

The revised text reads:

He was first married to Catherine Fallardeau, the daughter of Narcisse Fallardeau and sister of Mrs. West, who bore him seven children.  When she died in 1874 at the age of 31, he married Barbara Jamieson who may been from Aberdeenshire, Scotland.  This union produced no children.

Source for new info:

 Tannis Pond, descendant of John James Taylor and Narcisse Falardeau

Thank you, Tannis

Click here to return to Chapter 3, on page 68

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Revision date: 5 September 2000

Regarding William Cromarty-

Said Jane Cromarty via e-mail:

William did not come to Canada until 1843, but in the "First Ft. Langley " section it reads "In 1830 William Cromarty came to the Fort as Chief Cooper".

In Chapter 1, on page 12, in the section subtitled First Fort Langley, the original text read:

He and Yale then went to work perfecting a method of curing salmon for the foreign market.  The fish curing industry at Fort Langley, despite setbacks, went steadily ahead.  In 1830 William Cromarty came to the fort as Chief Cooper.  Another early cooper was James Rendall who was forced to quit owing to ill health.  A good cooper could turn out 7-10 barrels a week.

The revised text reads:

He and Yale then went to work perfecting a method of curing salmon for the foreign market.  The fish curing industry at Fort Langley, despite setbacks, went steadily ahead.  A good cooper could turn out 7-10 barrels a week, but they didn't have a cooper.  McDonald prevailed upon the fort's carpenter to try, even though he knew the carpenter had "never made a keg in his life".  In the three weeks that followed, Francois Faniant turned out fifteen 25 gallon barrels, with the help of Louis Ossin and Louis Delonie.   Faniant left the fort in the summer of 1830.  James Rendall, a cooper from Evie, Orkney, arrived in 1831 but had to quit due to ill health.  Rendall's replacement was replaced in turn by Chief Cooper William Cromarty in 1843. 

Sources for new info:

  • Jane Cromarty
  • Fort Langley Journals: 1827-30 edited by Morag Maclachlan
  • Hudson Bay Company Archives

Thank you, Jane.

Click here to return to Chapter 1, page 12

If you can add or correct information presented in the 1977 edition of The Langley Story Illustrated, by Donald E. Waite, drop us a line or contact Donald Waite directly.
Thank you.
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  • Page created 5 Sept 2000

    Copyright Donald E. Waite / Lisa M. Peppan